Magic Breakfast

No Child Left Behind – new website! Blog by Mari Burton from the NEU.

New data released by the End Child Poverty collation has revealed that even before the pandemic child poverty levels had risen to 4.3 million children – an increase of 200,000 on the previous year, This means that across the UK, 31 per cent of children are now growing up trapped in poverty – the equivalent of 9 pupils in every class of 30.

 

It doesn’t have to be this way. The Government must take urgent action to right this wrong.

 

The National Education Union have launched a brand new campaign website which allows visitors to search for the latest child poverty statistics for their area, simply by typing in their postcode. Visitors to the site are asked to email their local MP, asking them to show their commitment to tackling poverty in their area by signing the NEU’s anti child poverty pledge. The pledge reads:

 

As a member of Parliament, I pledge to do everything in my power so that no child is left behind in East Worthing and Shoreham:

  • I call for the development of a cross-Government strategy to eradicate the poverty faced by the 4.3 million children currently growing up trapped in poverty.
  • I will use my vote and voice in Parliament to try to stop an expected 730,000 more children being plunged into poverty by 2024.

We must value and invest in all our children, so they are supported to learn, succeed, and go on to have bright futures.

Poverty is not inevitable – with enough political will we can eradicate it. At the time of writing 91 MPs from across the parties had committed to do everything in their power to leave no child behind – check if yours has signed up by visiting nochildleftbehind.org.uk and supporting our campaign!


Keir Lewis, 4in10's Research and Learning Officer writes about the ending of the eviction ban.

A ‘tidal wave’ of evictions are coming.  

May 31st 2021 marked the end of the eviction ban following a series of temporary (often last-minute) extensions. This piece of legislation, whilst imperfect, provided the primary source of protection for renters during the pandemic. The eviction ban originally prevented eviction court hearings, temporarily ensuring eviction proceedings did not start. It also extended ‘minimum notice periods’, the minimum time period a landlord could give a tenant if they wished for them to leave the property, to six months. 

What Is Changing?  

From 1st June, bailiffs will legally be allowed to enter renter’s homes and enforce evictions. 

Minimum notice periods will also change. The notice period required to be given by landlords will drop to four months on 1st June and then to two months on 1st October. 

Why This Matters 

Many London renters face a myriad of housing challenges and the eviction ban simply papered over cracks.  

Inadequate social housing supply, employment insecurity, rising rents, unfit housing benefit and accelerating gentrification are all challenges that remained unaddressed by the eviction ban and the governments pandemic response.  

Nowhere else in the country does the cost of housing ‘push’ more people into poverty than in London. According to research from End Child Poverty, nine of the ten Local Authorities with the highest levels of child poverty are in London – with housing being a significant driver behind these figures. A recent London School of Economics report projected that 400,000 private tenants in London may be in significant rent arrears by the end of 2021. Whilst these figures in London are alarming, this is unsurprising given that nationally over £360 million has already been accumulated in covid-related rent arrears. 

All in all, this means London could be facing a period of evictions and homelessness like it has never experienced before. 

How Can We Help 

As part of the London Child Poverty Alliance, our manifesto called upon the new London Mayor to take action on housing. We called for legislative action to tackle exorbitantly high rents, urgently deliver new homes at social rent and improve the standards and conditions of temporary accommodation in London. 

However, this call for action cannot be seen as separate from our broader manifesto calls. Just like the eviction ban coming to a close in May, at present, the £20 uplift in Universal Credit is due to end at the end of September.  

We simply cannot allow our social safety net to be cut further. 

Getting Help 

If you’re worried about being evicted or supporting someone who is, Shelter offer support regarding the eviction ban and homelessness here. 

You can also use 4in10’s ‘Get Help’ support page here. 


Volunteer Week Free Resources

Volunteer Week runs from June 1st to June 7th. Download free resources and templates from the Volunteers Week resources page.