Sector Leaders defend charities right to campaign.

4in10 fully support the joint statement from social sector leaders on the right to campaign, issued following a speech in the House of Commons  by Sir John Hayes MP in which he stated that he and 20 other MP’s had written to the Charity Commission to complain about the Runnymede Trust’s response to the report by the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, (The Sewell report). Sir John asked for assurance from minister Kemi Badenoch that she make representations across government to “stop the worthless work—often publicly funded—of organisations that are promulgating weird, woke ideas…”  As the statement  says, the changes that charities are asking for are not “worthless” or “weird” but focused on solving some of this country’s most enduring challenges.


4in10 logo

Mental Health Support for Young Migrants and Asylum Seekers

In light of the dreadful 4th Suicide of a young Eritrean asylum seeker in the UK aged just 19, here are a number of London organisations supporting the mental health of young refugees, asylum seekers and migrants:


manifesto

Challenge Your Candidates to Help End Child Poverty!

On 6 May, Londoners will vote for the next Mayor of London and 25 London Assembly Members.

Members of the London Child Poverty Alliance (LCPA) have published a shared manifesto which calls on the London mayoral candidates to commit to key actions that will have a significant and lasting impact on rates of child poverty in the capital.

The manifesto calls for action in four key areas: income, hunger, housing and inequalities.

Take a look at the full manifesto here.

We hope this manifesto will encourage those running for Mayor and to be members of the London Assembly to put a commitment to end child poverty and protect the rights of all the city’s children at their heart of their plans to help London recover from the pandemic.

Please read and share.

 


London Elects

Register to Vote by 19th April!

The London mayoral elections and the elections for London Assembly Members are fast approaching.

To vote everyone needs to be registered by the 19th April.

That can be done online.

You can also print of the form and send it in.

The form asks for an NI number but it is possible to register without one.

There is an easy read version of the instructions developed by Mencap.

Once registered people can then apply for a postal vote if they don’t want to vote in person.

The postal vote application has to go to the local authority and the address for all the individual local authority postal vote applications is here.

It was estimated that in the last election over 9 million eligible adults were not registered to vote.

In London many of those were in temporary or insecure rental accommodation.

Those on the lowest income, with the most to lose, are the most likely not to be registered to vote and to believe that they cannot register.

So long as you have some form of address you can register even if you have to re-register at every election.


childfairstate

4in10's new Strategy Manager, Katherine Hill writes her first blog on why poverty is a human rights issue.

The right time for rights

The modern international human rights framework was born out of the chaos and trauma of the second world war. In the 1940s when the global community stood at a crossroads asking itself which way next, one response was the UN Declaration of Human Rights which sought to codify a set of universally held values: freedom, respect, equality, dignity and autonomy.

Over the past year this human rights framework, which to many in 21st century Britain had felt remote and was perceived by some as only benefitting groups at the margins of society, has become central to all our lives. The Government has been forced to take decisions which have curtailed our rights. The right to private and family life, the right to protest, the right to practise religion, have all been restricted in order to protect the right to life. Opinions about whether the correct balance has been struck between these rights have varied and many will argue that at points it has been wrong but the widespread acceptance of human rights as the right language for having the conversation has been striking. It has put those universal values centre stage once again.

As we look to the future, the challenge is shifting from protecting the right to life to the question of how we rebuild lives and livelihoods. That conversation again needs to be conducted firmly in the language of human rights and be rooted in the values they embody. It must be not only about civil and political rights, but also about how to protect the right to food, the right to work, the right to an adequate standard of living, the right to health, the right to education and the right to play. These rights are referred to as economic, social and cultural (ESC) rights and they are protected in international law in treaties such as the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (IESCR). Protection for them in our domestic law is weaker although that has begun to change in some parts of the UK; Scotland has recently become the first country in the UK to directly incorporate the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which includes many ESC rights.

What has been clear for a long time and has been brought into even sharper focus by the pandemic is that our economic and welfare systems are not upholding these rights for everyone. The shocking child poverty figures published this week (25th March) are testament to the fact that too many in work do not receive a wage that provides an adequate standard of living and that the safety net which should protect this right for those not in work and in low paid work is broken. The result of this failure is that children and their families are denied the freedom and dignity that others enjoy.

The good news is that in some quarters the language of values and rights are already very much part of the conversation. Children England's Child Fair State young leaders are well ahead of the game and have done inspirational work, reimagining the welfare state in a way that put values back at the heart of the system. The original welfare state was developed in the same era as the international human rights framework but was not an overtly rights-based system. If we are to emerge from the pandemic a more equal society, free from child poverty, it is time to put that right.


the rainbow centre

Spotlight on 4in10 member organisation, Rainbow Money Advice

Interview with Stuart from 4in10 member organisation Rainbow Money Advice

 

SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW

RAINBOW MONEY ADVICE, BARNET

  • How are you helping to tackle child poverty in London?

Rainbow Money Advice, established in 2015, is a service provided by Barnet Community Projects, and affiliated with Community Money Advice. We are based in the Rainbow Centre in a deprived part of the London Borough of Barnet.
Our aim is to give help and hope to people with money problems.  This is achieved by providing a free of charge money advice service that helps people deal with their debts, budgeting, and welfare benefits issues.  The service provides advice by appointments on Tuesdays.  We work closely with our colleagues Sarah and Jeanette, who run the Dollis Valley Angels emergency food delivery service at the Rainbow Centre, and with Anne and her team running a Lunch Club with activities for local school children in the school holidays.

  • Share with our members something positive about your organisation’s achievement or service.

As at the end of February 2021, we had held over 800 interviews, and helped 180 clients/families.  There have been cash successes of over £176,000 in annual awards (mostly welfare benefits, and savings in expenditure) – and over £130,000 in one-off gains, which include having debts cancelled and grants awarded.  Other successes include obtaining white goods and furniture for those who cannot afford them.  Several people who had been sleeping on the floor now have beds.  We have also helped make successful applications for Blue Badges, and Disabled Persons’ Freedom Passes.  We were delighted to be recently chosen to be Winner of the Barnet Group’s Community Group of the Year.
A memorable case, which highlights the work we do, concerns a woman diagnosed with a personality disorder, who had attempted suicide.  She incurred substantial rent arrears.  A successful application to Barnet Council for a Discretionary Housing Payment cleared the arrears and fortunately avoided eviction for our client and her four-year-old child.

  • What can other network members learn from you or find out more about through you?

Small agencies like ours do not have numerous volunteers and staff to discuss issues and share experiences.  It’s important, therefore, to build relationships with advisers in other agencies, and to participate in shared events, such as those provided by Money Advice Groups.  It’s also important to forge links with local charities providing mutual sources for signposting and referrals.
The Coronavirus pandemic has of course created many challenges for advisers and our clients.  We postponed our face-to-face appointments and replaced them with a remote service.  Some success has been achieved holding interviews by video, using Zoom and What’s App.  Being able to see your clients works best, as non-verbal clues can be missed over the phone.  Unfortunately, not all clients can afford, or are able to use, this sort of technology. Many clients seeking debt advice invariably brought large bundles of letters from creditors (often in unopened envelopes). Some clients have now been able to scan and email documents to us; whilst others have learnt to take photos with their mobile phones and send them to us by What’s App.
One positive from the pandemic is that it created the time and opportunity for money adviser Stuart to study online for the Certificate in Money Advice Practice.  This was provided by the Institute of Money Advisers with Staffordshire University (and kindly funded by Barnet Community Projects and the Thames Water Trust Fund).  The course is excellent, highly recommended, and the knowledge gained helps us to provide a much-needed service.

  • What would most help you achieve your goals?

More time and more volunteers = more money!  We are a small charity with limited resources, and there is a huge demand for appointments.  Our service has been a victim of its own success as the word has spread.  What started with helping people living across the road in the local estate has grown beyond expectations. Clients are being signposted/referred by numerous organisations, including local GPs and schools.  Our aim is to expand, to provide a service on several days of the week with a presence in other parts of the Borough.  We have started training new volunteers, and trainee Fanta (with experience gained at the Barnet Refugee Service) has already helped to advise clients.  More funding will enable us to train more volunteers and achieve our goals.

  • Why did you join 4in10? What do you enjoy about being part of the 4in10 network?

As already mentioned, networking is very important. 4 in 10 is a great organisation, with a shiny new website providing access to hundreds of great organisations, many of which have shared information and contacts with Rainbow Money Advice.  We always look forward to 4 in 10’s emailed Newsletter.  This is packed with essential information about events, surveys, campaigning, reports, job opportunities – and the all-important details of grants for clients, and funding for organisations.  It was through 4 in 10 that we experienced the inspiring London Child Poverty Week conference. We are grateful to 4 in 10 for bringing together the organisations and resources which will help us all tackle child poverty in London.

Contacts
For more information about Rainbow Money Advice, email Stuart Goodman on moneyadvice@barnetcp.org.uk or phone 07981 760 399 (Tuesdays and Thursdays).
For further information about Barnet Community Projects, our Dollis Valley Angels Project, or Lunch Club, email Steve Verrall on steveverrall@barnetcp.org.uk or phone 07946 728515.


My views on inequality and the upcoming London Mayoral Election by Alex Bax

Alex Bax, Chair of My Fair London has written a personal blog with his views on inequality and the upcoming London Mayoral Election.

Inequality in London almost doubled in the 1980s. It has stayed at this high level for the last thirty years.

We now have more billionaires than any other city in Europe, and more than another point in our history;

5% of Londoners own 50% of the wealth of our city. 50% of Londoners share only 5% of the wealth between them;

Homelessness has increased by 150% in the last ten years;

Child poverty has tripled in the last 40 years.

With the impending London election, now is the time to ask our mayoral candidates to make a commitment to reduce inequality.

In the foreword to his last manifesto, Sadiq Khan, London’s current mayor, said ‘For a child growing up on a council estate today, London is not the city of opportunity that it was for my brothers, my sisters and me.’  He is absolutely right, and the biggest underlying change that has made today’s London a much, much harder place for young people to get on, is the incredible increase in inequality that we have seen since 1979. To create a London that works for ‘all Londoners’, we must begin to reverse that 40 year drift to the extreme levels of inequality we all live with today, and the many small, medium and large insults that such an unfair society inflicts on every one us.

What we achieve in life is partly a function of our personal ambitions and interests, our capabilities and enthusiasms. But all our personal endeavour takes place in a context.  The harsher the context in which we live the harder it is for personal qualities to overcome circumstance. A very unequal society, where money has become the defining characteristic of worth, is a very harsh environment for us all.  Gross inequality makes it harder for every Londoner to live a full, free and fulfilled life. It makes life harder for the middle classes and for the poor, it most harms the chances of people at the very bottom, and even the rich are not immune from its impacts, as they retreat behind gates and security guards. If London’s mayor is to deliver on that promise to young Londoners growing up today, they must tackle inequality.

A wealth of international evidence shows that more equal societies have more social mobility.  This is partly because the shape of more equal societies, the steepness of the social and economic gradient, is less.  Each step up, or down the ladder is smaller, and because status anxieties are less, moves up or down are less psychologically difficult. We only have to look at the make-up of the current British cabinet to see how easily privilege begets privilege.  The London housing market is a great illustration of how the ladder of advantage is being pulled up behind those lucky enough to have bought their home in the past. Today a young Londoner without the ‘bank of mum and dad’ faces a far harsher future than the young Sadiq Khan. Inherited wealth is back, and the privilege it brings is back too.

When Sadiq Khan was growing up in the seventies and early eighties London was a far more equal city. His formative years came at the end of a 60-year period during which Britain had become ever more equal. Since 1979 the gap between rich and poor has returned to levels not seen since before the First World War.  1970s London was not a perfect society, racism was endemic and gay rights non-existent. However lower levels of economic inequality meant young people were more likely to feel they could get on. With narrower economic gaps between people mutual respect and a sense of belonging was stronger.  As inequality grew through the 1980s these ‘felt’ possibilities diminished, and at the same time the practical supports that any fair society should offer to people lower down the social scale were gradually eroded. Today, a family like Sadiq’s, with a bus driver as the main earner, would be incredibly fortunate to get a council flat.  They would more likely live in private rented accommodation on an insecure lease, and little Sadiq’s education would have been interrupted by his family having to move house several times, and probably change school. His bus driver father’s pay has stagnated over 40 years.  The increased wealth and productivity of the economy has been taken by the top 10 and top 1% of earners. Today Sadiq’s family would be in receipt of tax credits to help them make ends meet and would probably claim housing benefit to bridge the gap between their household income and the rent. As the children grew up and moved away the bedroom tax might force Sadiq’s parents to move again.  Instead of the rent the Khan family pay going to a local authority, to invest in more housing or other services, today that tax payers’ money most likely goes to a private landlord through housing benefit.  Frequent moves will have stressed Khan family relationships, and may also have made it difficult for his parents to send young Sadiq to the school of their choice, especially if richer neighbours have used their housing equity to move closer to a school that claims better results.

At school, status anxiety and a more competitive environment will have increased Sadiq’s chances of developing a mental health problem in his adolescent years, and the growing ‘social distances’ between social groups have made it less likely that young Sadiq has a group of friends from a range of backgrounds. Youth clubs, libraries, other public services accessible to all, but most useful to those with the least, have gradually been cut.  For a young man from an ethic minority living on a council estate in south London to stay out of the way of gangs (where poor young people attack each other over the pettiest of sleights or perceived threats to social status) is a real challenge.  One bright spot is that sustained investment in London’s state education system, with a focus on leadership and the quality of teaching, that started in the late 1990s, means that London’s schools do buck the trend nationally in raising the attainment of lower income children.  However, if young Sadiq does well at school and wants to go on to university to pursue his dream of becoming a lawyer he and his family will face the prospect of a mountain of student debt.

Of course, for the real Sadiq his late teenage years and early adulthood played out during the 1980s, the decade that saw what was probably the most rapid increase in inequality that Britain has ever seen. The most corrosive, pernicious effects of inequality take time to have an impact so perhaps the young Sadiq Khan, his family and community in South London, continued to benefit from the high point of equality that was Britain before 1979.

Today’s young Londoners, especially those living on council estates, face a world far less generous, and far more unequal than those of Sadiq Khan’s generation. Living in a highly unequal society exposes young people to chronic social stress. This in turn acts to dysregulate key biological systems in our bodies (cortisol levels for example) leading to increased life-time chances of a wide range of long-term health conditions and psychological problems. Being exposed to high levels of inequality is seriously toxic, and just like air pollution it is all around us.

The deep inequalities in our society set the scene for the lives of today’s young Londoners. Fairer societies have lower levels of crime, greater social mobility, lower levels of obesity and mental illness, higher levels of trust and higher and more fairly distributed life expectancy.  But high inequality is also a political choice. The UK has been far more equal in the recent past, and is far less equal than many other successful developed economies. I challenge the new mayor to recognise the harm inequality does to the city and put economic fairness at the heart of their programme.


job opening

Job Opportunity

4in10 Research and Learning Officer

Contract: full time, currently funded by City Bridge Trust to the end of March 2023
Salary: £30,279 (inclusive of London Weighting)

We are seeking an enthusiastic Research and Learning Officer with previous experience of undertaking and presenting research and running or contributing to training and learning events. You should have experience of collaborative working with service providers and / or infrastructure VCS organisations and a good level of knowledge around government policy on child poverty and trends affecting the children, young people and families’ VCS. A good understanding of the child poverty policy context in London is also desirable.

We are #OpenToAll and happy to talk flexible working.

How to Apply

  • Read the full job description and person specification which you can download here
  • Complete the application form which you can download here

If you would like an informal chat about this post please contact Katherine Hill, Strategic Project Manager, 4in10

Deadline for applications: 5pm, 31st March 2021. Interviews will be held on 8th, 9th, & 12th April 2021.


Little Village

Spotlight Interview - Little Village

https://littlevillagehq.org

  • How are you helping to tackle child poverty in London?

Little Village is like a foodbank, but for clothes, toys and equipment for babies and children up to the age of 5. In 2021 we’re marking our 5th Anniversary, and we’ve grown to become of the largest ‘baby banks’ in the UKsupporting over 11,000 children since we launched in 2016.  Families are referred to us via a network of over 1,800 professionals such as midwives and social workers.  As a volunteer-led movement of parents committed to alleviating child poverty, Little Village’s vision is that every child in the capital has the essential items they need to thrive.  The families we help are facing a range of challenges – homelessness, unemployment, low wages and domestic violence. 1 in 3 of the families we support are homeless or living in temporary accommodation.   In normal times, we support families from all over London, and currently have sites operating in Battersea and Camden.

  • Share with our members something positive about your organisation’s achievement or service.

Despite the constraints of lockdown, we supported 7000 children in 2020, the highest ever number, which we think is a huge achievement. In normal times, families would visit us at our sites around London. However, with the advent of coronavirus, we’ve had to temporarily close our doors to families and completely re-design our whole operation to become what we’re calling a #VirtualVillage.  We are currently operating a delivery service to families, using a mix of volunteer drivers and bicycle and van couriers to help us get the items to families.  As well as providing practical support, we are also keen to support families emotionally, which is particularly crucial with lockdown as families feel more socially isolated than ever. For example, our volunteers are calling over 100 families each week to build and deepen our relationships with them. In addition, we are connecting with families virtually and we recently hosted a virtual coffee morning with 30 mums where families had an opportunity to connect, chat and share their lockdown experiences.

  • What can other network members learn from you or find out more about through you?

As well as supporting families in the short term, we are working hard to tackle child poverty in the long term by continuing to raise awareness of the issue. For example, last week to mark our 5th Anniversary, we published a new report, supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, looking at the rates, persistence and depth of poverty in families with young children.  The research found 1.3 million of the 4.2 million children in poverty in the UK are babies and children under the age of 5. It also highlighted the impact of the Covid pandemic on low-income families with young children. Our new research led BBC 2’s Newsnight programme, which featured a report by Katie Razzall, it’s UK Editor who interviewed our founder Sophia Parker and Vicky Jones, a mum we have supported.  The next day, the PM Boris Johnson was asked a question about our report in PMQ’s by Ian Blackford MP, the SNP Leader in Westminster (10.48 in). We also shared the results of the survey in a webinar with over 180 participants.  The webinar will be available to watch on our website soon.

  • What would most help you achieve your goals?

We strongly believe in the power of collaboration to make change happen. There are a growing number of baby banks around the UK and we’re keen to work with them to amplify the voices of families we’re supporting. You can find out more about how you can get involved with our work here or please do get in touch directly with our new CEO Sophie Livingstone via sophie@littlevillagehq.org.

  • Why did you join 4in10? What do you enjoy about being part of the 4in10 network?

We think the 4in 10 network is a great way of continuing to engage in advocacy work by keeping across important information about research and advocacy in the area of child poverty.  It also provides a collaborative platform in which to connect with other organisations working to end child poverty.  Thank you for all the work you are doing to bring organisations together!


London Infinity Elite

Poverty Reports and Data, Funding Opportunities and News

Dear All

This issue has information about the Mayoral elections, the Select Committee Enquiry into child poverty and a Spotlight Interview at the end with Little Village. A very happy 5th birthday to them. They have done so much to help families over their 5 years while exposing the root causes of poverty, we are proud to have them as members. Read on for new reports and useful data as well as funding opportunities and an interesting job vacancy.

But first, 4in10 have a new Strategic Project Manager starting on March 8th. Her name is Katherine Hill and she comes with a wealth of campaigning and policy experience.  She joins us after serving for several years as a clerk to the Joint Committee on Human Rights in parliament, and before that she has had a number of human rights policy and campaigning roles at Age UK, Scope and The Children’s Society. We are excited to welcome her to the team.

Other 4in10 staff news is that Keisha is expecting a baby soon and has decided not to return after her maternity leave.  We all wish her and the new baby the very best of luck and much love.

Work and Pensions Select Committee Inquiry into child poverty – deadline for submissions 25th FebIt is important that organisations make submissions if you can.  If you would like some guidance as to what could go in a submission, CPAG have put together a briefing based on the main questions posed by the Committee.

The London Elections are planned for 6th May this year for the London Assembly and London Mayor. People must be on the electoral register to vote. It is simple to register online and applications for postal votes are available but people must be on the electoral register before applying for a postal vote. This is a good opportunity to ask candidates questions about poverty and inequality in London. If your organisation is contacting candidates please let us know the questions you are asking them and if you get a response that we can share. (Questions suggested in the link below for the End Child Poverty campaign might spark ideas.)
Candidates are:
Sadiq Khan      Labour  Contact
Shaun Bailey   Conservative  Contact
Sian Berry       Green Party  Contact
Luisa Porritt     Liberal Democrats  Contact
Also standing are the Women’s Equality Party, UKIP and a number of Independents.

From members and friends:

  • ACEVO, NCVO and the Lloyds Bank Foundation have published their final report on Rebalancing the Relationship between small and large charities and how the culture of commissioning impacts on this.
  • Be Gamble Aware and Expert Link have joined forces to develop a user led network of those affected by gambling.
  • Big Issue reports that government is proposing a new strategy to help people on low incomes heat their homes, but warn that people will still struggle to stay warm without a stronger benefit system and help getting out of problem debt. The proposals will extend the £140 Warm Home Discount to an extra 750,000 households,  including working-age households earning less than £16,190. This would mean a total 2.7 million people paying £140 less on their fuel bills every winter.
  • Beyond the Box are looking for young people aged between 14 and 25 and living in East London to attend a series of workshops on cultural programming, leading to possible work on the Peoples Pavilion events and programming. Applications closing shortly.
  • The Bike Project is looking for a new Trustee with lived experience of the asylum system.
  • Bromley By Bow Centre the Working Well Trust and the Work Rights Centre have joined forces to run a free webinar on employment and employability in Tower Hamlets. 4th March from 1-2pm.
  • Centre for London is working with the Mayors Office and others to produce a ‘shared vision for London 2050’. They have created a survey with a wide variety of options as to what matters to you and for London. Please do share the survey with your networks and those who use your services.
  • Children England, Lloyds Bank Foundation and others are hosting a webinar on the government’s procurement green paper as it impacts on the voluntary sector. 25th February 2.30 – 4.
  • Debt Free London have extended their 24 hour a day service throughout February. For debt advice and support call  0800 808 5700. Video advice session online debtfree.london/video WhatsApp message on 0800 808 5700 or live web chat online at debtfree.london.
  • Digital Candle is a free service matching voluntary organisations up with a volunteer expert for an hour of free digital adviceSubmit your question and within 48 hours you will receive an email matching you with an appropriate expert. No question is too broad or too niche; whatever you need to know, they will find someone who can help.
  • Doctors Of The World have published information on entitlement to the Covid vaccine.
  • End Child Poverty Campaign have a template email you can send to your local MP and ideas of questions to ask and how to phrase them. This can be linked to both the upcoming budget and the #NeverMoreNeeded campaign
  • Expert Link are recruiting a panel of people with lived experience of disadvantage and the benefit system to develop a strategy for long and short-term policy change, and lead monthly online forum with local and national influencers such as DWP Partnership Managers, national charities and Government officials. They are running a 2 part training session for anyone interested on Thursday 25th February (2-4pm) and Thursday 4th March (2-4pm).
  • Feeding Britain and Emma Lewell-Buck MP have published a briefing paper on Stemming the Rise of Child Poverty with some clear recommendations for immediate action.
  • Gingerbread and StepChange  have published a report on lone parent debt.
  • Homeless Link are running a survey until the 21st February for organisations providing homelessness services if they have used Homeless Link in any way.
  • Huffington Post have published a piece on the rise in Tuberculosis, a direct result of people living in poverty.
  • Juniper Education Dataset Report unsurprisingly shows it has been the youngest children whose learning has had the most significant drop during Covid, particularly those in last year’s Year 1, current Year 2s. Certain groups have been disproportionately affected by the disruption to their learning with disadvantaged pupils and those with special educational needs showing greater gaps than their peers.
  • Lime Bikes are offering all London key workers – from NHS and emergency service staff to carers, teachers and supermarket staff unlimited free Lime e-bike rides to help commuting in a safe and socially distanced way during lockdown.
  • Little Village have published their report on the rates, persistence and depth of poverty in families with young children. (See their Spotlight interview below)
  • Magic Breakfast are continuing their campaign to get the school breakfast bill through parliament. This is running until the end of February and there are many ways you can show your  support.
  • Maternity Action and the Women’s Budget Group are hosting a webinar on reforming shared parental leave. 19th February 1-2.15
  • Migrant Rights are running a series of workshops for migrants on NRPF and everyday rights each day from Feb 22nd to 24th from 1-3.
  • Money and Mental Health report the findings from the Mental Health and Income Commission that there is a significant gap in average income for those with mental health conditions and that this has worsened during Covid.
  • NCVO, Nottingham Trent and Hallam Universities have published their latest report on the impact of Covid on the voluntary sector. They welcome new participants in this ongoing study. It involves completing a survey and the information is important to evidence the fact that our sector is Never More Needed.
  • Refugee Council, Coram Children’s Legal Centre and six other organisations have written to the Children’s Minister calling for every unaccompanied child to receive the specialist care they need.
  • Revolving Door have compiled a collection of eight essays titled The Knot, that explore how poverty, trauma and structural disadvantage create and perpetuate multiple disadvantage. To launch its publication there is an event on the 25th February from 11-12.30 featuring contributors and those with lived experience.
  • Runnymede Trust have published a paper on ethnic inequalities in Covid 19 mortality.
  • Small Charities Coalition have launched a new mentoring service for organisations looking for peer to peer support. They also run events all year to support smaller organisations including governance issues, finance support and events in community languages on setting up a charity. The next ones are for health and wellbeing charities on the 22nd February from 10 – 11 and Poverty, Housing and Homelessness Small Charities Meet-Up with the ASA on the 23rd February from 10-11.
  • Sound Connections host the Music and Social Justice Network and welcome new members. Anyone working with children and young people in London through music is invited to join.

Local Authority and Health Statutory Updates:

Funding Opportunities:

Job vacancy at Save the Children:
Senior Policy Adviser and Advocacy Adviser (UK Child Poverty), will lead Save the Children’s UK child poverty policy work targeting the UK government.

Keep an eye out for announcements about 4in10’s new website. The plan is for test runs to start on the 22nd February with the site going fully live on the 1st March. The site is planned to be very interactive and to include the work started during London Challenge Poverty Week, creating a searchable and useful list of the many wonderful voluntary organisations working directly with child poverty in London. We still welcome your photos or videos to share on the site, which we intend  will visually reflect our members work. All material will be credited.

Finally, thank you to Little Village for their Spotlight interview below and if you would like to be our Spotlight organisation in March or April or if you have information to share with our network, please do get in touch.

Very best wishes and stay safe.
Liza